Episode 79 – Fabian Domination

The history of Rome from the founding of the City continues and, if the title is a hint, the fabulous Fabians are at the forefront of the narrative!

In the wake of the horrific Battle of Veii in 480 BCE we head into c. 479 BCE. While we follow Livy and Dionysius of Halicarnassus predominantly at this time, we also see a little of the Fasti Capitolini creep in.

After a little bit of faffing about the consuls Caeso Fabius (cos. III) and Titus Verginius Tricostus Rutilus emerge – were these two just as in favour with the plebeians and the patricians? Livy has some details to offer on this front!

We also see a disruption to the argarian situation led by Caeso Fabius – how will that turn out? Dr Radness has the answer.

Relations with Veii

Rome continues to conduct expansionist activity into the territory around the City. Fabius is sent out against the Aequians while Verginius heads towards the Veientes. The situation with Veii becomes increasing complicated as Rome learns more about Veii’s friends in the north.

As the drama unfolds, we take you through some curious moments where the troops are released from the standards, Veii and her allies move south as far as mount Janiculum(!), and the Romans begin to develop a new policy to deal with the increasing challenges with Veii.

It’s at the point that this episode gains its name as the power of the Fabian family is confirmed when the Fabii raise their own forces to serve as a border garrison. This is an innovation in Rome’s way of thinking about the edges of their territory. Hear all the details here!

Fabian Domination

Errata: in our excitement we talked about Titus Siccius as though he were the ‘hot centurian’. This is definitely our mistake and we apologise. The ‘hot centurian’ Marcus Flavoleius has no part in the narrative of c. 479 BCE. Titus Siccius was a legate with imperium in the battle of Veii in 480 BCE cf. Dion. Hal. Rom. Ant. 9.12.5 and he continues to lead troops and saves Verginius from a spot of military bother.


Les Falisques au milieu du Ve siècle avant JC. Image Credit to ColdEel & Ahenobarbus and Wikimedia Commons

Drs R and G laugh and spar their way through the ancient Roman world!

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